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Slavery Abolished

Following its ratification by the requisite three-quarters of the states earlier in the month, the 13th Amendment is formally adopted into the U.S. Constitution, ensuring that “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.” Before the American Civil War, Abraham Lincoln and other leaders of the anti-slavery Republican Party sought not to abolish slavery but merely to stop its extension into new territories and states in the American West.

In November 1860, Lincoln’s election as president signaled the secession of seven Southern states and the formation of the Confederate States of America.

Four more Southern states joined the Confederacy, while four border slave states in the upper South remained in the Union.

Following the major Union victory at the Battle of Antietam in September, Lincoln issued a warning of his intent to issue an emancipation proclamation for all states still in rebellion on New Year’s Day.

The Emancipation Proclamation transformed the Civil War from a war against secession into a war for “a new birth of freedom,” as Lincoln stated in his Gettysburg Address in 1863.

On December 2, 1865, Alabama became the 27th state to ratify the 13th Amendment, thus giving it the requisite three-fourths majority of states’ approval necessary to make it the law of the land.

Alabama, a former Confederate state, was forced to ratify the amendment as a condition for re-admission into the Union.

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